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Quantum Radar Enhances Stealth Technology

Quantum Radar Enhances Stealth Technology

University of Waterloo in Ontario built a functional quantum radar using quantum entanglement

The violently charged particles in the region of Canadian arctic are released by sunspots that draw solar flares. This solar interference challenges separation of important radio signals from background noise, especially while detecting a stealth missile. A team of researchers from University of Waterloo in Ontario are focused on replacing the conventional radar stations with more efficient quantum radars that are powered by the phenomenon known as ‘quantum entanglement’.

In quantum physics, entangled particles are a set of two particles that share a special connection. A change in one particle due to a force or action leads to spontaneous change in the paired particle even in conditions where the two particles are separated by huge distances. Such change requires that the particles correlate their states with each other faster than the speed of light. Albert Einstein dubbed this phenomenon as spooky action at a distance and recent experiments have demonstrated that spooky action at a distance really does seem to happen.

Entangled photon pairs in a quantum radar would be linked with each other on a scale of miles rather than light-years. A crystal must split clusters of individual photons that results in each severed photon as an entangled pair. One photon in a pair would belong to the radar station, whereas the second would be transmitted into the sky. When the second photon strikes an object in the sky it would bounce off and be deflected. The return time of the photon would describe the position and speed of the object.

Stealth planes are capable of deceiving radio waves. However, any attempt to alter the photon that hits an object would instantly be reflected in the state of the stationary photon as the two are entangled. Moreover, the entanglement between the photon pair enables the quantum radar to separate the signal of the entangled photon bouncing off an object from the noise of other light particles cruising through the atmosphere. The article was published by the University of Waterloo on April 12, 2018.



Anagha Kulkarni
Anagha Kulkarni,

Anagha Kulkarni
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