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Novel Technology Upgrades Self-Driven Vehicles

Novel Technology Upgrades Self-Driven Vehicles

Researchers from University of Delaware developed a technology that can eliminate the need for traffic lights and reduce fuel consumption

A team of researchers from University of Delaware developed a new driverless car technologies that can facilitate roads without traffic lights and speeding tickets. Moreover, the innovations is expected to reduce fuel consumption by 19 to 22%. The researchers stated that vehicles connected with this technology could adjust to driving conditions with little to no input from drivers. Such a vehicle would accelerate only when the vehicle in front of it speeds up and when the vehicle in front of it stops, the other vehicle would also come to a halt.

The team used control theory to develop algorithms that are the base of the novel technology. In two papers published in the journal Automatica and IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems, the team described the UD Scaled Smart City (UDSSC) testbed and a driving simulator facility, which are innovations in connected and automated vehicle technology, in two laboratories at the University of Delaware. According to the researchers, the technology can allow vehicles to communicate with each other to coordinate traffic patterns. In collaboration with Boston University, the team developed a solution to control and minimize energy consumption in connected and automated vehicles that cross an urban intersection, which lacked traffic signals. A software was used to simulate their results and the team found that their framework enabled connected and automated vehicles to conserve momentum and fuel along with improved travel time.

The team in collaboration with University of Virginia, developed a solution that yields the optimal acceleration and deceleration in a speed reduction zone. The solution can therefore help to avoid rear-end crashes and connected vehicles could use 19 to 22% less fuel and reach destinations 26 to 30% faster than human-driven vehicles. The results of this research effort were published in IEEE Transactions on Intelligent Transportation Systems on October 11, 2018. The team received funding for the research from two U.S. Department of Energy programs: the Smart Mobility Initiative and the Advanced Research Projects Agency: Energy's NEXTCAR program.



Anagha Kulkarni
Anagha Kulkarni,

Anagha Kulkarni
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