Home Technology Conversion Of Mechanical Energy Into Electrical Energy Through New Wearable Device
Conversion Of Mechanical Energy Into Electrical Energy Through New Wearable Device

Conversion Of Mechanical Energy Into Electrical Energy Through New Wearable Device

Novel wearable technology lead advancements in defense mechanisms and consumer-based electronics.

Research team at the Purdue University have created a fascinated liquid-metal-inclusion based triboelectric nanogenerator, called LMI-TENG. The energy harvesters fitted in the device convert conserved mechanical energy into electrical power to feed the electronic appliances. According to IDTechEx, an electronic company, said that the technology will hit the market in 2028 with a turnover of 480 million US dollars.

The LMI-TENG receives and recognizes the biomechanical signals transmitted by the body and uses those signals to power electrical and technological devices. Two Ecoflex layers are embedded in the device with a layer of liquid metal silicon in between the former layers. The metal liquid silicon layer allows deforming and morphing into any desired shape. Wenzhuo Wu, Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering at the Purdue University said, “Our technology allows the synergistic engineering of TENG components at the material, structural and output levels." The energy that was otherwise wasted is now converted into electrical energy to power electronic appliances.

The novel technology is stemmed to the concept of a fascinated movie in which a robot is engaged in self-repairing through a secret liquid formula. This technology was developed for self-powering devices to advance in an ever growing digital world. It has applications for innovations such as advanced healthcare in every sector, robotics, virtual reality, augmented reality, human- machine interface, wearable and handy sensors, digital sensors, teleoperation and computing mechanism. The technology developed at the Purdue University was a debatable and hot topic which was featured by Journal of Materials Chemistry A in the February edition, 2019. Thus, this is a significant step towards human-integrated devices.


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